Energy, Infrastructure & Economic Needs Provide Unique National Opportunity

Huge metal gas pipeline transporting gas

While we all suffer from the effects of the Coronavirus, it does provide an opportunity for the United States to solve many problems at once.  Read how in my latest piece for Forbes.com.

Click here to read more.

Questions? Let me know.

Daniel Markind of Flaster Greenberg
Daniel Markind is a shareholder at Flaster Greenberg PC with over 35 years of experience as a real estate and corporate transactional attorney. He has represented individuals and companies in the energy industry for over 20 years. Dan is a frequent lecturer on Marcellus Shale and other mineral extraction issues and is regularly asked to speak at conferences, in the media and at other venues regarding energy issues and their legal and political implications.

The Appalachian Trail – A Battlefield In The Pipeline Conflict?

Oil well with pump-jack in the Carpathian Mountains

The latest skirmish in the fight over natural gas pipelines runs along the Appalachian Trail.  To see how and why, read my latest piece for Forbes.com.

Click here to read more.

Questions? Let me know.

Daniel Markind of Flaster Greenberg
Daniel Markind is a shareholder at Flaster Greenberg PC with over 35 years of experience as a real estate and corporate transactional attorney. He has represented individuals and companies in the energy industry for over 20 years. Dan is a frequent lecturer on Marcellus Shale and other mineral extraction issues and is regularly asked to speak at conferences, in the media and at other venues regarding energy issues and their legal and political implications.

Pacific Dreams & Nightmares

Oregon state cap.jpg

By a vote of 17-11, the Oregon State Senate last week just passed a five-year moratorium on fracking in that State. The Senate bill cut in half a 10-year moratorium passed in March by the Oregon House of Representatives, but the House is expected to quickly agree to the Senate version. Then the bill will be passed along to Governor Kate Brown, who is likely to sign it.

The fracking moratorium comes on the heels of the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality’s rejection of Section 401 Clean Water Certifications for the Jordan Cove Pipeline, which would have transported gas and oil to a terminus on Coos Bay in economically depressed Southwestern Oregon. Currently there are no fracking operations in Oregon. The proposed moratorium and the DEQ decision, however, put Oregon clearly in the camp of states that stake out an environmentalist position, with future consequences to be seen.

North of Oregon, across the Canadian border, the province of British Columbia lost a ruling issued by the Provincial Court of Appeals where the Court said that the BC government could not stop the Mountain West Pipeline from Edmonton, Alberta to Burnaby, BC, north of Vancouver. Long time readers of this blog will remember that last year two Canadian provinces, Alberta and British Columbia, almost had a trade war over BC’s attempts to stop the pipeline.

What BC did accomplish was forcing out the pipeline developer, Kinder Morgan, and requiring the Canadian Federal Government to take over the project. That Canadian Federal involvement was the main reason the BC Court of Appeals rejected BC’s latest attempt to stop Trans Mountain. The Court ruled that the Province did not have the power to stop what now is a Federal enterprise.

Given the Section 401 Certification situation in Oregon, which we have seen repeated elsewhere in the United States, such as New York’s recent rejection of the Northeast Supply Enhancement Pipeline, it bears asking the question of whether this will be the model that we will have to follow in this country to get interstate pipelines built at all? Will the US Government actually have to build the pipelines itself and fight out Federal-State constitutional issues every time we need to build a pipeline somewhere?

All along the North American West Coast, states and provinces are moving against what they perceive as “dirty” energy.  But as they move against oil and natural gas (although don’t ask BC about coal, which the Province still hypocritically produces and exports in massive quantities), the West Coast needs viable energy sources to replace them. That part of the equation remains lacking.

What the West has now is large quantities of wishful thinking and good intentions, but no sensible, practical or economically viable energy policy. This is true especially in the short term, as Westerners assume that, eventually, so-called green energy will be sufficiently widespread to actually fill projected needs.

Left Coast residents should take heed. Laws that appear good in the abstract can be devastating when put into actual practice. Good intentions are never sufficient to make up for lost services that are essential to human life and economic well-being.

If Oregon goes ahead with its fracking moratorium and bans Jordan Cove, it will need to ensure that it has energy sources ten years in the future. Does it have a plan for this? If so, the Oregon public has a right to know what it is. If that plan calls for large amounts of “renewables”, the public should ask itself how that power gets stored and transmitted. Will Oregon need massive new investment in huge batteries to store solar energy that cannot be produced at night or power lines to move wind power from the wilderness (where it is typically generated) to populated areas where it is most needed?  If that’s the case, what type of power lines will Oregon need?  Are they the same type that just was shown to have caused California’s deadly and destructive wild fires last year?  If large batteries are needed, does this battery storage technology even exist to handle all that would be needed if there were no fossil fuels?  Technologically, can any of this actually be done – at least in 2019 – 2029?  If not, what official in Kate Brown’s Administration gets to tell the good citizens of Portland, Eugene and Medford that there will be no heat during the winter?

Questions? Let me know.

Daniel Markind of Flaster Greenberg

Daniel Markind is a shareholder at Flaster Greenberg PC with over 35 years of experience as a real estate and corporate transactional attorney. He has represented individuals and companies in the energy industry for over 20 years. Dan is a frequent lecturer on Marcellus Shale and other mineral extraction issues and is regularly asked to speak at conferences, in the media and at other venues regarding energy issues and their legal and political implications.

NESE Rejected

At 8:30 p.m. yesterday, the State of New York Department of Environmental Conservation rejected Williams Corporation’s proposal for the Northeast Supply Enhancement (NESE) natural gas pipeline. Citing potential water contamination from the project, which mostly would run into New York Bay, the DEC refused to issue the required Section 401 Clean Streams Certification.

The decision was made “without prejudice,” meaning Williams can resubmit its application. The company said it planned to do so.

In reaction to the DEC decision, the two power companies that serve New York City and Long Island, National Grid and Consolidated Edison, are expected to follow through on their moratoria against any new gas hookups in practically the entire New York City metropolitan area within New York State. Among other things, that means that a planned new arena for the New York Islanders ice hockey team to be located in Elmont, New York likely is dead.

A more interesting question will be how this move affects New York City’s bond rating as a whole. Without available new natural gas service, will the rating agencies feel as confident about Downstate New York’s future growth potential?

All of this, and many other questions, remain to be answered.

Questions? Let me know.

Daniel Markind of Flaster Greenberg

Daniel Markind is a shareholder at Flaster Greenberg PC with over 35 years of experience as a real estate and corporate transactional attorney. He has represented individuals and companies in the energy industry for over 20 years. Dan is a frequent lecturer on Marcellus Shale and other mineral extraction issues and is regularly asked to speak at conferences, in the media and at other venues regarding energy issues and their legal and political implications.

Shale Gas News Podcast – Pipelines, Fracking & More

shale gas news podcast

I had a great time on the Shale Gas News Podcast over the weekend discussing New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s dilemma regarding approval of the NESE pipeline, the decision by Oregon to deny a Section 401 Clean Streams Certification for the Jordan Cove Pipeline, the banning by Washington Governor Jay Inslee of fracking in his state, and the battle near Death Valley over lithium mining, which is needed to make renewable energy sources viable.

Check it out here in case you missed it. (My interview appears at 18:55).

Questions? Let me know.

Daniel Markind of Flaster Greenberg

Daniel Markind is a shareholder at Flaster Greenberg PC with over 35 years of experience as a real estate and corporate transactional attorney. He has represented individuals and companies in the energy industry for over 20 years. Dan is a frequent lecturer on Marcellus Shale and other mineral extraction issues and is regularly asked to speak at conferences, in the media and at other venues regarding energy issues and their legal and political implications.